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Cozumpark Bilisim Portali
Posted in Windows Powershell, Windows Server | No Comment | 2,358 views | 30/06/2014 17:32

You can use following script to get Port and Fabric WWN information from FCinfo via PowerShell.

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# Get FCInfo Details
$FcToolCmd = "C:\StorageTools\fcinfo\fcinfo.exe /details"
 
# Create WWN Array
$WWNArray = @()
 
# Create Hash Table
$WWNInformation = @{}
 
# Port WWN Information
$FabricDetails = Invoke-Expression $FcToolCmd | Where {$_ -match "port_wwn"}
foreach ($FabricInfo in $FabricDetails)
{
	# Get Port WWN
	$FabricRegex = $FabricInfo -match "\b\S{2}\:\S{2}\:\S{2}\:\S{2}\:\S{2}\:\S{2}\:\S{2}\:\S{2}\b"
	$PortWWN = $Matches[0]
 
	# Add Hash Table
	$WWNInformation."$PortWWN" = "NULL"
 
	# Add WWN Array
	$WWNArray += $PortWWN
}
 
# Fabric Index
$FabricIndex = 0;
 
# Fabric WWN Information
$FabricDetails = Invoke-Expression $FcToolCmd | Where {$_ -match "fabric"}
foreach ($FabricInfo in $FabricDetails)
{
	# Get Fabric WWN
	$FabricRegex = $FabricInfo -match "\b\S{2}\:\S{2}\:\S{2}\:\S{2}\:\S{2}\:\S{2}\:\S{2}\:\S{2}\b"
	$FabricWWN = $Matches[0]
 
	# Get Port WWN
	$PortWWN = $WWNArray[$FabricIndex]
 
	# Add Hash Table
	$WWNInformation."$PortWWN" = "$FabricWWN"
 
	# Update Fabric Index
	$FabricIndex++
}
 
# Output Results
$WWNInformation

That will give you a hashtable as a result, so you can see details.


Posted in Windows Powershell, Windows Server | No Comment | 37,537 views | 27/06/2014 09:55

Following scripts require EMC Storage Integrator (ESI) PowerShell Toolkit (ESIPSToolkit).

Getting EMC Storage Snapshot Pools:

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Import-Module ESIPSToolkit
function Get-EMCStorageSnapPools {
	$Storages = Get-EMCStorageSystem
	foreach ($Storage in $Storages) {
		$GlobalID = $Storage.GlobalID
		$Snappool = Get-EMCSnapshotPool | Where StorageSystemGlobalId -eq $GlobalID
		$Properties = New-Object Psobject
		$Properties | Add-Member Noteproperty StorageName $Storage.UserFriendlyName
		$Properties | Add-Member Noteproperty AvailableCapacity $Snappool.AvailableCapacity
		$Properties | Add-Member Noteproperty UserCapacity $Snappool.UserCapacity
		Write-Output $Properties
	}
}
Get-EMCStorageSnapPools

Getting Storage List:

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Import-Module ESIPSToolkit
$Storage = Get-EMCStorageSystem
$Storage.UserFriendlyName

Getting Storage Thin Pools:

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Import-Module ESIPSToolkit
function Get-EMCStorageThinPools {
	$Storages = Get-EMCStorageSystem
	foreach ($Storage in $Storages) {
		$GlobalID = $Storage.GlobalID
		$Thinpool = Get-EMCStoragePool | Where SupportsThinProvisioning -eq "True" | where StorageSystemGlobalId -eq $GlobalID
 
		foreach ($Pool in $Thinpool) {
			$Properties = New-Object Psobject
			$Properties | Add-Member Noteproperty StorageName $storage.UserFriendlyName
			$Properties | Add-Member Noteproperty PoolName $pool.Name
			$Properties | Add-Member Noteproperty TotalCapacity $pool.TotalCapacity.ValueGB
			$Properties | Add-Member Noteproperty AvailableCapacity $pool.AvailableCapacity.ValueGB
			$Properties | Add-Member Noteproperty SubscribedCapacity $pool.SubscribedCapacity.ValueGB
			Write-Output $Properties
		}
	}
}
Get-EMCStorageThinPools

Registering Host:

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$StorageArray = Get-EMCStorageSystem "CX4_1"
$HostRegistration = "C0:03:FF:00:00:FF:FF:00:C0:03:FF:65:4D:A6:00:00","C0:03:FF:00:00:FF:FF:00:C0:03:FF:37:25:4E:00:16"
$RegisterHost = New-EMCStorageRegisteredHost -StorageSystem $StorageArray -HostName "Server01" -IpAddress "192.168.0.114" -HostBusAdapterIds $HostRegistration

To be continued.. :)


Posted in Windows Server | No Comment | 10,298 views | 26/06/2014 11:16

You can apply this Bios settings to HP Proliant DL980 and HP Proliant DL580 for your Microsoft SQL Servers.

Bios

You can review full notes from “Best Practices for Tuning Microsoft SQL Server on the HP Proliant DL980 Server”:

Whitepaper is written for DL980 but HP confirms that Bios settings also applies for DL580.

Thanks to Bunyamin Topan for sharing this information :)


Posted in Virtual Machine Manager, Windows Powershell, Windows Server | No Comment | 1,809 views | 24/06/2014 09:42

You can update all SCVMM agents with following script:

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$Credential = Get-SCRunAsAccount -Name "Domain_Account"
$HyperVHosts = Get-SCVMMManagedComputer
foreach ($HyperVHost in $HyperVHosts)
{
	$ManagedComputer = Get-SCVMMManagedComputer -ComputerName $HyperVHost
	Update-SCVMMManagedComputer -Credential $Credential -VMMManagedComputer $HyperVHost
}

That will update all Hyper-V hosts agents as soon as possible.


Posted in Windows Powershell, Windows Server | 3 Comments | 1,812 views | 23/06/2014 11:44

This is third version of Hyper-V Cluster Memory Reports.

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$Clusters = Get-Content Clusters.txt
foreach ($Cluster in $Clusters)
{
	[int]$TotalFreeMemory = 0;
	[int]$TotalMemory = 0;
	[int]$TotalUsedMemory = 0;
	[int]$NodeCount = 0;
	$ClusterNodes = Get-Cluster $Cluster | Get-ClusterNode
	foreach ($ClusterNode in $ClusterNodes)
	{
		[int]$FreeMemory = [math]::round(((Get-WmiObject -ComputerName $ClusterNode -Class Win32_OperatingSystem).FreePhysicalMemory / 1MB), 0) - ([math]::round(((Get-WmiObject -ComputerName $ClusterNode -Class Win32_OperatingSystem).TotalVisibleMemorySize / 1MB), 0)*10/100)
		[int]$TotalFreeMemory = [int]$TotalFreeMemory + [int]$FreeMemory
		[int]$NodeMemory = [math]::round(((Get-WmiObject -ComputerName $ClusterNode -Class Win32_OperatingSystem).TotalVisibleMemorySize / 1MB), 0)
		[int]$TotalMemory = [int]$TotalMemory + [int]$NodeMemory
		[int]$UsedMemory = [int]$NodeMemory - [int]$FreeMemory
		[int]$TotalUsedMemory = [int]$TotalUsedMemory + [int]$UsedMemory;
		[int]$NodeCount = [int]$NodeCount + 1
	}
	[int]$TotalAvailableMemory = [int]$TotalFreeMemory - [int]$NodeMemory - ([int]$NodeMemory*10/100)
 
	Write-Host "Cluster: $Cluster"
	Write-Host "Total Memory: $TotalMemory"
	Write-Host "Total Free Memory: $TotalFreeMemory"
	Write-Host "Total Used Memory: $TotalUsedMemory"
	Write-Host "Total Available Memory: $TotalAvailableMemory"
	Write-Host "Node Count: $NodeCount"
 
	Write-Host " "
 
	$Value = $Cluster + ";" + $TotalMemory + ";" + $TotalFreeMemory + ";" + $TotalUsedMemory + ";" + $TotalAvailableMemory + ";" + $NodeCount + ";" + $NodeMemory
	Add-Content -Value $Value -Path Memory.txt
}

You should add your clusters into Clusters.txt file.


Posted in Windows Powershell, Windows Server | No Comment | 12,135 views | 22/06/2014 17:35

My name is Yusuf Ozturk. I’m a PowerShell MVP and a system engineer at the Cloud team of a private bank where we have biggest Hyper-V production environment in Turkey. Managing large virtualization environment could be a headache if you don’t do your growing plans well or if you are growing quickly than you are expected. Patching Microsoft Updates to your Hyper-V Clusters could be problematic if you face with following issues:

1. Don’t have enough memory
2. Don’t have enough disk space

That means, your cluster is over-committed..

Also this issues could increase your pain in this scenario:

1. VMs with large memory (like 64GB memory or more)
2. VMs with vHBA
3. VMs with Passthrough Disks

Because you should do a good planing if you have large VMs in a over-committed environment because migrating that VMs won’t be an easy job than you think. Also misconfigured SAN switches, WWN configurations etc could be a problem for VMs with vHBa. Also drivers and firmwares could cause some issues for vHBA. As my experience, best way for migrating a VM with vHBA is keeping that offline. Otherwise you can lose disk connectivity anyway and it could damage your system, even you can lose data. So using clustered vHBA VMs can increase your uptime but also prevents data lose.

For the Passthrough disks, Hyper-V always get some issues with PT disks, couldn’t handle it well. So Microsoft doesn’t recommend it anymore maybe they will stop support with vNext, who knows..

So with this scenarios, current built-in Cluster-Aware Updating (CAU) has some problems:

1. CAU doesn’t know your VMs with vHBA or PT, because Cluster is handling them..
2. CAU doesn’t know your memory issue
3. CAU doesn’t know your disk issue
4. CAU doesn’t know if VM has a large memory

That’s why you can see that, Cluster tries to send a VM with 64 GB memory into a Hyper-V host with 32 GB free memory. Because Cluster only checks free memory in Cluster nodes. So i re-imagined CAU and wrote my own CAU process. What I do in my scenarion:

1. I can suspend VMs with vHBA and PT disk unless Cluster Node is online. (This is my choice, you can always use Live migrations)
2. I know which Cluster node has largest free memory. But what I know more is, which VM has largest memory as well. So I start with largest memory footprint VM, migrate it to best Cluster node. After that I can start migrating low memory VMs into that Host because there are still some memory for VMs like 2 GB, 4 GB etc..
3. I don’t leave migrations to Cluster Management. I do my own migrations. So that will give me my own control mechanism and that will give me flexibility. I can set timeout for VM migrations, so if a VM could not migrate in timely fashion, I can migrate it offline..

This is my own steps. You can always edit my script for your own requirements. Now lets see my new CAU script:



Posted in Windows Powershell, Windows Server | 1 Comment | 2,215 views | 20/06/2014 22:51

You may want to check available Microsoft Updates on remote servers. This script will give you that info.

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Function Get-MicrosoftUpdate {
 
<#
    .SYNOPSIS
 
        Function to get available Microsoft Updates on Windows Servers.
 
    .DESCRIPTION
 
        If you have large number of Windows Servers, Microsoft Updates may not be an easy job.
		This script could get available Microsoft Updates from remote servers by using PowerShell.
 
    .PARAMETER  WhatIf
 
        Display what would happen if you would run the function with given parameters.
 
    .PARAMETER  Confirm
 
        Prompts for confirmation for each operation. Allow user to specify Yes/No to all option to stop prompting.
 
    .EXAMPLE
 
        Get-MicrosoftUpdate
 
    .EXAMPLE
 
        Get-MicrosoftUpdate -ComputerName Server01
 
    .EXAMPLE
 
        Get-MicrosoftUpdate -ComputerName Server01 -SuppressMode		
 
    .INPUTS
 
        None
 
    .OUTPUTS
 
        None
 
    .NOTES
 
        Author: Yusuf Ozturk
        Website: http://www.yusufozturk.info
        Email: ysfozy@gmail.com
        Date created: 19-June-2014
        Last modified: 22-June-2014
        Version: 1.2
 
    .LINK
 
        http://www.yusufozturk.info
        http://twitter.com/yusufozturk
 
#>
 
	[CmdletBinding(SupportsShouldProcess = $true)]
	param (
 
		# ComputerName
		[Parameter(
			Mandatory = $false,
			HelpMessage = 'Computer Name')]
		$ComputerName = "localhost",
 
		# Suppress Mode
		[Parameter(
			Mandatory = $false,
			HelpMessage = 'Suppress Mode')]
		[switch]$SuppressMode = $false,
 
		# Debug Mode
		[Parameter(
			Mandatory = $false,
			HelpMessage = 'Debug Mode')]
		[switch]$DebugMode = $false
	)
 
	# Enable Debug Mode
	if ($DebugMode)
	{
		# Set Error Action Preference
		$ErrorActionPreference = "Stop"
 
		# Set Debug Preference
		$DebugPreference = "Continue"
	}
	else
	{
		# Set Error Action Preference
		$ErrorActionPreference = "silentlycontinue"
	}
 
	if ($ComputerName -ne "localhost")
	{
		if (!$SuppressMode)
		{
			# Informational Output
			Write-Host "Getting Microsoft Update information from $ComputerName.." -ForegroundColor Cyan
			Write-Host "Please wait.." -ForegroundColor Gray
			Write-Host " "
		}
 
		# Invoke Script on Remote Computer
		$InvokeCommand = Invoke-Command -ComputerName $ComputerName -ArgumentList $SuppressMode, $DebugMode -ScriptBlock {
 
			# Define Parameters
			param ($SuppressMode, $DebugMode)
 
			# Create Microsoft Update Session
			$UpdateSession = New-Object -ComObject "Microsoft.Update.Session"
 
			# Search Microsoft Updates
			$UpdateSearcher = $UpdateSession.CreateUpdateSearcher()
			$SearchResult = $UpdateSearcher.Search("IsInstalled=0 and IsHidden=0")
 
			# Create Microsoft Update Install Queue
			$InstallQueue = New-Object -ComObject "Microsoft.Update.UpdateColl"
 
			for ($i = 0; $i -lt $SearchResult.Updates.Count; $i++)
			{
				# Get Current Microsoft Update
				$Update = $SearchResult.Updates.Item($i)
 
				# Get Microsoft Update Description
				$UpdateDescription = $Update.Title
 
				# Microsoft Update KB Pattern
				$KBPattern = "KB\d{1,20}"
 
				# Search for Microsoft Update KB
				$RegexSearch = $UpdateDescription -match $KBPattern
 
				# Get Microsoft Update KB
				$UpdateKB = $Null;
				$UpdateKB = $Matches[0]
 
				if (!$SuppressMode)
				{
					# Informational Output
					Write-Host "-------------------------------------------------"
					Write-Host " "
					Write-Host "$UpdateKB is available to install.." -ForegroundColor Cyan
					Write-Host "Description: $UpdateDescription" -ForegroundColor Gray
					Write-Host " "
				}
 
				# Add to Install Queue
				$InstallQueue.Add($Update) | Out-Null
 
				# Reboot Behaviour
				if ($Update.InstallationBehavior.RebootBehavior -gt 0) 
				{ 
					# Set Reboot Status
					$RebootRequired = $True
 
					if (!$SuppressMode)
					{
						# Informational Output
						Write-Host "Warning: $UpdateKB requires reboot." -ForegroundColor Yellow
						Write-Host " "
						Write-Host " "
					}
				}
				else
				{
					if (!$SuppressMode)
					{
						# Informational Output
						Write-Host "$UpdateKB doesn't require reboot." -ForegroundColor Green
						Write-Host " "
						Write-Host " "
					}
				}
			}
 
			if ($InstallQueue.Count -eq 0)
			{
				if (!$SuppressMode)
				{
					# Informational Output
					Write-Host "Warning: There are no Microsoft Updates available" -ForegroundColor Yellow
				}
 
				# Update Status
				$UpdateStatus = "False"
			}
			else
			{
				if (!$SuppressMode)
				{
					# Informational Output
					Write-Host "Available Microsoft Updates: $i" -ForegroundColor Green
				}
 
				# Update Status
				$UpdateStatus = "True"
			}
 
			# Output Update Status
			$UpdateStatus
		}
 
		if ($SuppressMode)
		{
			# Output Invoke Command Results
			$InvokeCommand
		}
	}
	else
	{
		# Create Microsoft Update Session
		$UpdateSession = New-Object -ComObject "Microsoft.Update.Session"
 
		# Search Microsoft Updates
		$UpdateSearcher = $UpdateSession.CreateUpdateSearcher()
		$SearchResult = $UpdateSearcher.Search("IsInstalled=0 and IsHidden=0")
 
		# Create Microsoft Update Install Queue
		$InstallQueue = New-Object -ComObject "Microsoft.Update.UpdateColl"
 
		for ($i = 0; $i -lt $SearchResult.Updates.Count; $i++)
		{
			# Get Current Microsoft Update
			$Update = $SearchResult.Updates.Item($i)
 
			# Get Microsoft Update Description
			$UpdateDescription = $Update.Title
 
			# Microsoft Update KB Pattern
			$KBPattern = "KB\d{1,20}"
 
			# Search for Microsoft Update KB
			$RegexSearch = $UpdateDescription -match $KBPattern
 
			# Get Microsoft Update KB
			$UpdateKB = $Null;
			$UpdateKB = $Matches[0]
 
			if (!$SuppressMode)
			{
				# Informational Output
				Write-Host "-------------------------------------------------"
				Write-Host " "
				Write-Host "$UpdateKB is available to install.." -ForegroundColor Cyan
				Write-Host "Description: $UpdateDescription" -ForegroundColor Gray
				Write-Host " "
			}
 
			# Add to Install Queue
			$InstallQueue.Add($Update) | Out-Null
 
			# Reboot Behaviour
			if ($Update.InstallationBehavior.RebootBehavior -gt 0) 
			{ 
				# Set Reboot Status
				$RebootRequired = $True
 
				if (!$SuppressMode)
				{
					# Informational Output
					Write-Host "Warning: $UpdateKB requires reboot." -ForegroundColor Yellow
					Write-Host " "
					Write-Host " "
				}
			}
			else
			{
				if (!$SuppressMode)
				{
					# Informational Output
					Write-Host "$UpdateKB doesn't require reboot." -ForegroundColor Green
					Write-Host " "
					Write-Host " "
				}
			}
		}
 
		if ($InstallQueue.Count -eq 0) 
		{
			if (!$SuppressMode)
			{
				# Informational Output
				Write-Host "Warning: There are no Microsoft Updates available" -ForegroundColor Yellow
			}
 
			# Update Status
			$UpdateStatus = "False"
		}
		else
		{
			if (!$SuppressMode)
			{
				# Informational Output
				Write-Host "Available Microsoft Updates: $i" -ForegroundColor Green
			}
 
			# Update Status
			$UpdateStatus = "True"
		}
 
		if ($SuppressMode)
		{
			# Output Update Status
			$UpdateStatus
		}
	}
}

So if you just type:

Get-MicrosoftUpdate

that will get Microsoft Updates on your local server.
If you want to get Microsoft Updates from remote server, then type like:

Get-MicrosoftUpdate -ComputerName "MyHyperVHost01"

That will give you Reboot requirements as well.